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Is Crohns Disease Classed As A Disability?

Is Crohns Disease Classed As A Disability?
 

Is Crohns Disease Classed As A Disability?

It’s a question that is asked a lot by people with IBD (which is anyone suffering from Crohns Disease or Ulcerative Colitis), is Crohns Disease classed as a disability.

Posted By Peter Buckley 18th March 2013 updated 16th November 2013

Is Crohns Disease Classed as a Disability

Is Crohns Disease Classed as a Disability?

I am only going to be covering information that concerns people who live in the UK.

TopIs Crohns Disease Classed As A Disability?

The DWP look at Crohns Disease from a care and mobility view-point, to qualify for disability living allowance or PIP as it is going to be called from 2013.

People in remission, people with mild disease and those whose exacerbations respond quickly to medication are unlikely to have any long-term functional restrictions affecting their ability to walk or provide self-care. (highly unlikely you will get awarded PIP)

Some people with disease of moderate severity may be restricted in their ability to stand, bend/kneel and walk around due to abdominal pain and the effects of complications such as fistulas. These individuals are likely to be taking more potent drugs, have frequent exacerbations of abdominal pain and diarrhoea and be attending hospital regularly. Some may need help with dressings and treatments from nurses. They may be restricted in their ability to self-care, including preparation of meals if symptoms last for some months or fail to respond to standard drug regimes. It is unlikely however that walking would be severely restricted since lower limb function is normal. Anxiety and concern about diarrhoea and needing to locate a toilet when out are not considered to be an indication that guidance or supervision are necessary. (if you are in this portion of patients, then we suggest you pursue your claim)

People with the most severe disease are constitutionally unwell, have low body weight, evidence of malnutrition, decreased muscle bulk and persistent pain. These individuals have progressive disease with complications that have failed to respond to both medical treatments and surgery. They are likely to need help with self-care and some will have considerable restriction in walking.(if you are in this portion of patents, the we suggest you pursue your claim, if you don’t get awarded, then there is something seriously wrong with the system.)  

When Crohn’s Disease is classed as a disability

  • Mobility Problems due to abdominal pain
  • Unable to self-care
  • Complications, fistulas, incontinence, low body weight, malnutrition, blockages and bowel abscesses (to name a few)
  • Depression
  • Unresponsive to drug treatments and surgery

DWP Website

TopMy Advice

The DLA forms can be a challenge to complete when you are not feeling well, so I suggest you get some help from a family member or friend. There are some very handy guidelines provided by Crohn’s & Colitis UK

New Guide to claiming PIP by Crohn’s & Colitis Here – http://www.crohnsandcolitis.org.uk/whats-new/updated-publication-claiming-personal-independence-payment-pip

My own advice for filling in the forms, is base your application on your worst day and be consistent, some of the questions are repeated but worded differently, so watch out for those questions.

If your first claim is rejected, always appeal the first decision.

TopMore Information

NEW

A guide to Employment and Support Allowance – The Work Capability Assessment – Click Here

 

  1. Nicola03-11-14

    Hello.
    I’d like to say that, having recently won my year-long battle with the DWP over my eligibility for ESA (I am now in the support group), I also applied for PIP – but only after a very steep learning curve via my ESA experience that damn near killed me.

    For my PIP application I used the information available on this site. It was invaluable. After 31 years with UC I still had something new to learn – for example, I would never have considered the mental issues associated with having such a (in my case) debilitating illness. I can’t recommend the Help Sheets on PIP enough.

    I took my completed application form to a disability advice centre, and an adviser looked over it and was extremely impressed by the quality of the application. The information on this website had allowed me to cover every base. In fact, the only thing the adviser changed was to insist that I put down that a home visit was necessary – which I got.

    Unfortunately, your success at getting benefits at the moment
    depends entirely on how well you complete the forms and dodge the loaded questions. I cannot stress enough how important it is to use the information on this site and get some professional advice to supplement it (if you can).

    I also cannot emphasise enough how important it is to have your assessment (for any benefit) recorded, and also to record it covertly, yourself; you have the right to do this, and believe me, you WILL need to have that information if your claim is denied.

    As with most things in life, knowledge and preparation save a lot of distress and heartache further down the line.

    Please use the information on this website – it really is invaluable.

    • Peter Buckley03-11-14

      I am so glad you found the information helpful, I think the mental anguish that IBD brings, we as suffers just deal with and do not talk about it. The mental side so often overlooked.
      If you have an IBD nurse, I would mention the mental effects that UC has on you and ask if there is any additional support that they can provide for you.

  2. Cat Jane03-21-14

    Not sure if this is the right forum but I hope you can help. I have worked for the NHS for 22 years despite having Crohn’s, 2 resections 25 years ago, I have had the odd flare up but am presently having quite a bad flare up with the possibility of more surgery and change of medications. I would like to take early ill health retirement from the NHS (I am 53) but I can’t seem to find much in the way of advice, even from HR, about whether or not I would qualify for one of the tiers as on a good day I may be able to manage to do some work which would be good for me mentally. It seems to be such a minefield as whilst I await this decision i have been told my employment would be terminated. Hope you can help or point me in the right direction for advice. Many thanks CJ

  3. Peter Buckley03-22-14

    Cat, I have done quite a bit of research on the question that you asked and I have drawn the same conclusion as you have done.
    The best advice that I can give to you, if you follow the path of early retirement due to ill health. Is to get your union involved in every step to early retirement.
    From all the information I have found on-line it looks like the NHS can terminate your employment before you claim is even adjudicated which seams grossly unfair.
    You will have to make sure you document everything and make sure that you make it crystal clear about the metal anguish that Crohn’s Disease causes you and is a serve enough for you not be able to carry on your duties as you have done in the past.
    As you get older Crohn’s Disease becomes even more difficult to deal with on all levels.

    (Just a bit more information – http://www.doctorsifa.co.uk/nhspensionfaqs/ http://www.rcn.org.uk/__data/assets/pdf_file/0007/549331/Ill_Health_Retirement_2014.pdf)

    I wish you well and keep in touch on how things go.

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